Here are some

H.O.N.E.Y. Resources

Articles and links

H.O.N.E.Y. asks you to look into the links below to understand the unique challenges, and perspectives, of it's BIPOC youth, and multi-racial/multi-cultural families.

A century after the end of the Civil War, more than a dozen states still had laws on the books banning interracial marriage. Enter Mildred and Richard Loving, a Virginia couple whose June 12, 1967 Supreme Court ruling dealt a major blow to miscegenation laws.
The couple married in 1958 in Washington — where interracial marriage was legal — then moved to their home in Central Point, Virginia. Weeks later, the local sheriff came into their home in the middle of the night and they were charged with violating several Virginia codes, including one that made it “unlawful for any white person in the state to marry any save a white person.”…

Racial identity development among college students with parents from different heritage groups was largely unexplored until the 1990s, when two forces—one demographic, the other theoretical—converged to stimulate interest in understanding the experiences and identities of biracial and multiracial youth. The increasing number of students from two or more races (Renn, 2004) drew the attention of student affairs professionals just as student development researchers moved into a period of close study of individual identity groups (for example, Black, Asian American, gay/lesbian/ bisexual)…

The soaring sound of “Wade in the Water,” a Negro spiritual once said to be used on the Underground Railroad, filled Plymouth Congressional United Church of Christ Saturday morning.  

But on this particular Saturday, church-goers offered their respects to the Great Spirit, in addition to the Holy Spirit, looked on as a Native American drum processional wound its way through the aisle, and took part in a ceremonial tobacco offering…

My daughter was about two years old when she leaned forward to poke her head through the seats of our rental car one day to tell me that “Mummy is white” and “Daddy is brown”. “That’s right, I replied, slightly caught unaware that at that age, she would be pointing out our differences. “What colour are you?”.

The question seemed to stumble her, but only for an instant, before she replied “light brown!”

The rest of the journey was spent telling me what other colours people in her family were…

They searched the world for a match.

Bennett Sevack needed a bone marrow transplant. He was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome after treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. But there was no match for the Ann Arbor resident in the international registry.

So, his family started making calls.

Doctors first tried his siblings and cousins. When that didn’t work, his sisters, friends and family spent six weeks calling and sharing flyers with synagogues around the world to encourage people to join the bone marrow registry, hoping someone with Sevack’s Sephardic and Ashkenazi Jewish background would be willing to donate…

I have been happily married to my white husband for 10 years this December. Being married to him does not make me less black.

I love him because we have so many things in common, and we genuinely enjoy each other’s company. We share many of the same beliefs and life goals. I believe that we were created for each other.

He happens to be my white husband and I just happen to be his black wife.

I remember when some of my black associates and girlfriends found out that I was dating someone white…

Pandango sa ilaw, tinikling, and dances from award-winning dance group, Parangal, that are familiar to Filipinos and those of Filipino heritage.

But not for this audience.

Here in the municipal palace of Colima, Mexico — a cultural program like this serves as a textbook come to life.

For years, Omar Suarez Zaizar and his fellow Colimenses have heard of Filipinos and Filipino culture — and the shared history between the Philippines and Mexico…

Rui Hachimura says he gets his height from his Beninese father and his work ethic from his Japanese mother — a combination that has propelled him to basketball stardom.

The 21-year-old made history in June when he became the first Japanese to be selected in the first round of the NBA draft, picked up by the Washington Wizards….

Sometimes, it’s an aggressive shout, like a hostile interrogation of identity. Other times, it’s gentle and marveling, purred with a tilted head, as if part of an anthropological investigation. Always, it sucks. 

As a biracial person who grew up in a midsized midwestern city, I am used to existing in spaces where I am the Only One. Often the sole non-white person in any given classroom, restaurant, or party, I first became accustomed to the stares, and later, to the questioning…

“Do they live far?” the woman asks me in the swimming pool changing rooms, nodding her head towards my son. “We live across the river, not far from here,” I reply, not quite understanding the wording of her question. On my way home I realize that her choice of pronoun referred to my son’s family—which she assumed I was not a part of. She did not think my child was mine. I bite my lip and wipe the tears from my eyes…